Information related to Elvina Roloff's Death murder

photo of Elvina Roloff, 1987
photo of Elvina Roloff, 1987

Stopped breathing February 7, 2001.
15607 N.E. 270th Circle
Battle Ground, Washington 98604
Clark County

Why Elvina Roloff HAD TO be MURDERED the night of September 7, 2001

Click here for Overview of Elvina Roloff's death.

Click here for Overview the Cheatham Family's Benefits of Elvina Roloff's death.

Click here for a Table of events and documents related to the death of Elvina Roloff

Click here for a Table describing Marie Cheatham's refusal to provide information about Elvina Roloff

Click here for a Table describing Marie Cheatham's inheritance of more than 80% of Elvina Roloff's assets.

Click here for details of Staff Credentials related to the care of Elvina Roloff.

Click here to read requests for documents filed in Superior Court, addressed to Marie Cheatham.
She did not respond to any request.


DEFINITIONS:

Main Entry: euthanize
Pronunciation:
'yŁ-th&-"nIz
Variant(s): or euthanatize /
yu-'tha-n&-"tIz/
Function: transitive verb
Inflected Form(s): -nized or -tized; -niz∑ing or -tiz∑ing
Etymology: Greek euthanatos
Date: 1873
: to subject to euthanasia

(from www.m-w.com)

Main Entry: euthanasia
Pronunciation:
"yŁ-th&-'nA-zh(E-)&
Function: noun
Etymology: Greek, easy death, from euthanatos, from eu- + thanatos death -- more at THANATOS

Date: 1869
: the act or practice of killing or permitting the death of hopelessly sick or injured individuals (as persons or domestic animals) in a relatively painless way for reasons of mercy
- euthanasic /
-zik, -sik/ adjective
(from www.m-w.com)

first degree murder
n. although it varies from state to state, it is generally a killing which is deliberate and premeditated (planned, after lying in wait, by poison or as part of a scheme), in conjunction with felonies such as rape, burglary, arson, or involving multiple deaths, the killing of certain types of people (such as a child, a police officer, a prison guard, a fellow prisoner), or certain weapons, particularly a gun. The specific criteria for first degree murder, are established by statute in each state and by the U.S. Code in federal prosecutions. It is distinguished from second degree murder in which premeditation is usually absent, and from manslaughter, which lacks premeditation and suggests that at most there was intent to harm rather than to kill.
(from dictionary.law.com)

second degree murder
n. a non-premeditated killing, resulting from an assault in which death of the victim was a distinct possibility. Second degree murder is different from first degree murder, which is a premeditated, intentional killing or results from a vicious crime such as arson, rape or armed robbery. Exact distinctions on degree vary by state.
(from dictionary.law.com)

manslaughter
n. the unlawful killing of another person without premeditation or so-called "malice aforethought" (an evil intent prior to the killing). It is distinguished from murder (which brings greater penalties) by lack of any prior intention to kill anyone or create a deadly situation. There are two levels of manslaughter: voluntary and involuntary. Voluntary manslaughter includes killing in heat of passion or while committing a felony. Involuntary manslaughter occurs when a death is caused by a violation of a non-felony, such as reckless driving (called "vehicular manslaughter"). Examples: Eddy Hothead gets into a drunken argument in a saloon with his acquaintance Bob Bonehead, and Hothead hits Bonehead over the head with a beer bottle, causing internal bleeding and death. Brent Burgle sneaks into a warehouse intent on theft and is surprised by a security man, whom Burgle knocks down a flight of stairs, killing him. Both are voluntary manslaughter. However, if either man had used a gun, a murder charge is most likely since he brought a deadly weapon to use in the crime. The immediate rage in finding a loved one in bed with another followed by a killing before the passion cools usually limits the charge to voluntary manslaughter and not murder, but prior attacks could convince a District Attorney and a jury that the killing was not totally spontaneous. Lenny Leadfoot drives 70 miles per hour on a twisting mountain road, goes off a cliff and his passenger is killed in the crash. Leadfoot can be charged with involuntary manslaughter.
(from dictionary.law.com)

murder
n. the killing of a human being by a sane person, with intent, malice aforethought (prior intention to kill the particular victim or anyone who gets in the way) and with no legal excuse or authority. In those clear circumstances, this is first degree murder. By statute, many states consider a killing in which there is torture, movement of the person before the killing (kidnapping) or the death of a police officer or prison guard, or it was as an incident to another crime (as during a hold-up or rape), to be first degree murder, with or without premeditation and with malice presumed. Second degree murder is such a killing without premeditation, as in the heat of passion or in a sudden quarrel or fight. Malice in second degree murder may be implied from a death due to the reckless lack of concern for the life of others (such as firing a gun into a crowd or bashing someone with any deadly weapon). Depending on the circumstances and state laws, murder in the first or second degree may be chargeable to a person who did not actually kill, but was involved in a crime with a partner who actually did the killing or someone died as the result of the crime. Example: In a liquor store stick-up in which the clerk shoots back at the hold-up man and kills a bystander, the armed robber can be convicted of at least second degree murder. A charge of murder requires that the victim must die within a year of the attack. Death of an unborn child who is "quick" (fetus is moving) can be murder, provided there was premeditation, malice and no legal authority. Thus, abortion is not murder under the law. Example: Jack Violent shoots his pregnant girlfriend, killing the fetus. Manslaughter, both voluntary and involuntary, lacks the element of malice aforethought.
(from dictionary.law.com)

premeditation
n. planning, plotting or deliberating before doing something. Premeditation is an element in first degree murder and shows intent to commit that crime.
(from dictionary.law.com)

malice aforethought
n. 1) the conscious intent to cause death or great bodily harm to another person before a person commits the crime. Such malice is a required element to prove first degree murder. 2) a general evil and depraved state of mind in which the person is unconcerned for the lives of others. Thus, if a person uses a gun to hold up a bank and an innocent bystander is killed in a shoot-out with police, there is malice aforethought.
(from dictionary.law.com)

felony murder doctrine
n. a rule of criminal statutes that any death which occurs during the commission of a felony is first degree murder, and all participants in that felony or attempted felony can be charged with and found guilty of murder. A typical example is a robbery involving more than one criminal, in which one of them shoots, beats to death or runs over a store clerk, killing the clerk. Even if the death were accidental, all of the participants can be found guilty of felony murder, including those who did no harm, had no gun, and/or did not intend to hurt anyone. In a bizarre situation, if one of the holdup men or women is killed, his/her fellow robbers can be charged with murder.
(from dictionary.law.com)

justifiable homicide
n. a killing without evil or criminal intent, for which there can be no blame, such as self-defense to protect oneself or to protect another or the shooting by a law enforcement officer in fulfilling his/her duties. This is not to be confused with a crime of passion or claim of diminished capacity, which refer to defenses aimed at reducing the penalty or degree of crime.
(from dictionary.law.com)

homicide
n. the killing of a human being due to the act or omission of another. Included among homicides are murder and manslaughter, but not all homicides are a crime, particularly when there is a lack of criminal intent. Non-criminal homicides include killing in self-defense, a misadventure like a hunting accident or automobile wreck without a violation of law like reckless driving, or legal (government) execution. Suicide is a homicide, but in most cases there is no one to prosecute if the suicide is successful. Assisting or attempting suicide can be a crime.
(from dictionary.law.com)

PARTIAL LIST OF TOPICS

Marie A. Cheatham POA caregiver beneficiary
Daniel T. Cheatham
Johanna Bice
Paul L.Jacobsen MD
David A.Smith MD
J.Higgins RN
Sarah Quackenbush RN
M. Cassidy RN
R. Hatfield
Southwest Washington Medical Center
Hospice Southwest
Anne Holstrom
Edward J.Sale MD
Krystal Ashling ACSW
Jeannette Sale MSW
Sherilyn Brown MSW
DNR do not resuscitate
Secure Horizons insurance
roxanol morphine
euthanasia pain anxiety
BattleGround Washington
Battle Ground
Vancouver Washington
Clark County
coroner / medical examiner
Jill Kurtz attorney lawyer

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Last Update March 23, 2017